Most men have small penis syndrome say Doctors
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Women are much more interested in a man’s personality and looks than the size of his cheap viagra, but men can experience real anxiety even if they are average sized, according to a research review published in the June issue of the urology journal BJU International.



Dr Kevan Wylie from the Porterbrook Clinic and Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, UK, reports that while men often have a better body image, genital image and sexual confidence if they have a large cheap cialis, women don’t necessarily feel that bigger is better.



He teamed up with Mr Ian Eardley from St James’ Hospital in Leeds to bring together the findings of more than 50 international research projects into penile size and small penis syndrome carried out since 1942.



By drawing together the results of 12 studies that measured the penises of 11,531 men, they discovered that average erect penises ranged from 14-16cms (5.5 to 6.2 inches) in length and 12-13cm (4.7 to 5.1 inches) in girth.



Wylie and Eardley also looked at the bizarre practices used by men worldwide to enhance the size of their penis, including the Topinama of Brazil, who encourage poisonous snakes to bite their penises to enlarge them for six months!



They report that Indian Sadhus men are known to use weights to increase the length of their penis and Dayak men in Borneo pierce the glans of their penis and insert items into the holes to stimulate their partner.



Other key findings of the review include:



•A survey of over 50,000 heterosexual men and women found that 66 per cent of men said their penis was average sized, 22 per cent said large and 12 per cent said small. 85 per cent of women were satisfied with their partner’s penile size, but only 55 per cent of men were satisfied.



•Two studies reported that 90 per cent of women prefer a wide penis to a long one. Other studies pointed out that the issue of male attractiveness was complex, but that penile size was not the most important factor for women.



•Small penis syndrome is much more common in men with normal sized penises than those with a small micropenis with a flaccid length of less than 7cm (2.7 inches).



•One study found that 63 per cent of men complaining of small penises said their anxieties started with childhood comparisons and 37 per cent blamed erotic images viewed in their teenage years. None of the men studied actually had a micropenis.



•Another report based on data collected by Kinsey in the 1940s reported that, on average, homosexual men had larger penises than heterosexual men. The report authors suggest that exposure to male reproductive hormones in the womb may be one explanation.



•Individual research studies have also suggested that penis size is smaller in studies focussing on older men, but Wylie and Eardley found no overall differences when they collated the results of various studies.



•The review also provided little evidence of racial differences, with the exception of one Korean study where the men had smaller than average-sized penises. The authors suggest this area needs further investigation.



•Evidence on the effectiveness of vacuum devices, penile extenders and traction devices was found to be limited, but the authors noted that patients may experience psychological benefits from some of them.



•The review also showed that the results of surgery are poorly documented and significant complications can ensue.



“It is very common for men to worry about the size of their penis and it is important that these concerns aren’t dismissed as this can heighten concerns and anxieties” says Dr Wylie.



“It is helpful to normalise the situation and provide as much accurate information as possible, as many men either lack any information or have been misinformed.



“This extensive review aims to provide clinicians with an overarching summary of the many research projects that have been carried out into penile size and small penis syndrome.”



Clinicians who are presented with a man with small penis syndrome need to consider a number of treatment approaches.



“The initial approach should be a thorough urological, psychosexual, psychological and psychiatric assessment, possibly with more than one clinician involved” say the authors.



“Conservative approaches to therapy, based on education and self-awareness, as well as short-term structured psychotherapies, are often successful.”



They authors are, however, very cautious when it comes to treating a psychological condition like small penis syndrome with gadgets or surgery.



“There is poorly documented evidence to support the use of penile extenders, and while information is starting to emerge on the success of some surgical techniques, this is not backed up by data on patients’ satisfaction with such procedures” stresses Dr Wylie.



Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Israel has Locked up JABARA village since 2002 - Even the most basic health care is a luxury
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UNICEF: Delivering health services to isolated West Bank:

"JBARA, Occupied Palestinian Territory, 26 May 2009 Nestled in a small crook of land, surrounded by the barrier between the West Bank and Israel, sits the community of Jbara, home to nearly 300 people.

Today there is a rush of activity in one of the larger houses. Posters are pinned on clotheslines and a health education session is under way in the garden.

For the first time since the barrier enclosed this community in 2002, UNICEF has been able to arrange a long-awaited visit from health workers. It builds upon work with the Ministry of Health to bring vaccinations and rudimentary care to marginalized and enclosed communities in the West Bank.

Through these visits, UNICEF aims to broaden the range of basic but life-saving child care practices and help mothers living in isolated enclaves.

Overcoming obstacles

The barrier not only separates Jbara from other villages and basic services, such as schools and health centres, but has also separated the people of nearby Tulkarem from their farmlands in Jbara.

Permits are required to enter and leave Jbara, and crossing through the military gates is often a difficult and time-consuming process. Conflict, as well as access and movement restrictions, have led to losses of jobs and rising poverty.

By 2008, half of Palestinian households were living in poverty, according to the UN Development Programme.

“The challenge remains reaching isolated communities in restricted areas,” said UNICEF Health and Nutrition Officer Samson Agbo. “Families have gotten much poorer very quickly, and children are the most susceptible to the impact of household poverty.

A sombre feeling

Earlier in the day, a team from the Ministry of Health had given out water purification cialis and talked about the importance of proper hygiene and sanitation. Lack of sanitation facilities and a functioning sewage system is a growing concern.

“The community... must discharge the untreated sewage in to the fields,” says local resident Na'da Awad. “This has increased the risk of disease and infections, as well as allergies and skin lesions.”

As the small children play together in the garden, there is a sombre feeling. “There are no recreation facilities available to the children here,” says one mother. “There is not much around to inspire them to play.”

Across the West Bank and Gaza, UNICEF is providing basic vaccines and immunization-related supplies, as well as vitamin A, vitamin D and iron supplements, as well as increasing knowledge on basic nutrition practices and strengthening health workers' capacity for infant and child care. With these interventions, UNICEF aims to raise the number of children benefiting from early childhood development, with a special emphasis on children in hard-to-reach areas such as the Jbara community.

Read more: http://www.unicef.org/infobycountry/o..."



Palestine Video - A Palestine Vlog

CIA bribing Afghani Warlords with Viagra??
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CIA bribing Afghani Warlords with order cialis??

Viagra helps CIA win friends in Afghanistan

The Afghan chieftain looked older than his 60-odd years, and his bearded face bore the creases of a man burdened with duties as tribal patriarch and husband to four younger women. His visitor, a CIA officer, saw an opportunity, and reached into his bag for a small gift.
Four blue pills. cialis.
"Take one of these. You'll love it," the officer said. Compliments of Uncle Sam.

The enticement worked. The officer, who described the encounter, returned four days later to an enthusiastic reception. The grinning chief offered up a bonanza of information about Taliban movements and supply routes — followed by a request for more pills.
For U.S. intelligence officials, this is how some crucial battles in Afghanistan are fought and won. While the CIA has a long history of buying information with cash, the growing Taliban insurgency has prompted the use of novel incentives and creative bargaining to gain support in some of the country's roughest neighborhoods, according to officials directly involved in such operations.
'Whatever it takes'In their efforts to win over notoriously fickle warlords and chieftains, the officials say, the agency's operatives have used a variety of personal services. These include pocketknives and tools, medicine or surgeries for ailing family members, toys and school equipment, tooth extractions, travel visas, and, occasionally, pharmaceutical enhancements for aging patriarchs with slumping libidos, the officials said.
"Whatever it takes to make friends and influence people — whether it's building a school or handing out Viagra," said one longtime agency operative and veteran of several Afghanistan tours. Like other field officers interviewed for this article, he spoke on the condition of anonymity when describing tactics and operations that are largely classified.

CIA bribing Afghani Warlords with Viagra??
gekikava
CIA bribing Afghani Warlords with purchase cialis??

Viagra helps CIA win friends in Afghanistan

The Afghan chieftain looked older than his 60-odd years, and his bearded face bore the creases of a man burdened with duties as tribal patriarch and husband to four younger women. His visitor, a CIA officer, saw an opportunity, and reached into his bag for a small gift.
Four blue pills. cheap cialis.
"Take one of these. You'll love it," the officer said. Compliments of Uncle Sam.

The enticement worked. The officer, who described the encounter, returned four days later to an enthusiastic reception. The grinning chief offered up a bonanza of information about Taliban movements and supply routes — followed by a request for more pills.
For U.S. intelligence officials, this is how some crucial battles in Afghanistan are fought and won. While the CIA has a long history of buying information with cash, the growing Taliban insurgency has prompted the use of novel incentives and creative bargaining to gain support in some of the country's roughest neighborhoods, according to officials directly involved in such operations.
'Whatever it takes'In their efforts to win over notoriously fickle warlords and chieftains, the officials say, the agency's operatives have used a variety of personal services. These include pocketknives and tools, medicine or surgeries for ailing family members, toys and school equipment, tooth extractions, travel visas, and, occasionally, pharmaceutical enhancements for aging patriarchs with slumping libidos, the officials said.
"Whatever it takes to make friends and influence people — whether it's building a school or handing out Viagra," said one longtime agency operative and veteran of several Afghanistan tours. Like other field officers interviewed for this article, he spoke on the condition of anonymity when describing tactics and operations that are largely classified.

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